Furry Friends: The Story of Fey

I really couldn’t imagine myself living out a happy existence without having at least one animal around the house. Once I got a place of my own, it wasn’t long until I found myself a furry friend. I had always been more of a dog person, no offense to cats, but it was just what I was used to. 

So when my partner suggested we get a cat, I was excited as well as apprehensive. In my mind, cats were all just moody lumps of laziness. We toured a couple of shelters in hope of finding a friend.In the end, I think I found my perfect match.  

At our final destination, I walked into the kennel area and peeked in on each cat. Ryan had already taken one of the cats out at the other end, and brought her to me. She was a tiny all-black shorthair, and she was beautiful. He put her in my arms and she proceeded to look up into my eyes…and nip my nose…and then move on to lick it. Instant connection. I spent the rest of my time there while Ryan and our roommate looked at the other cats. During that time, the little cat had fallen asleep in my arms. It was then I noticed one of her front legs wasn’t quite right. It could be best described as looking like a “club foot”. The shelter staff then told me that she had been born that way, and that she would have the whole forelimb amputated once they confirmed that she had a home. Poor kitty. 

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She was very affectionate, energetic, and seemed to be used to not walking on the leg  anyway. I then decided that she would be the one I would adopt.  At the time, she was named Lacey, but I wasn’t sure if it was really fitting. I settled on the name “Fey” (a word meaning “fairy”). 

We weren’t able to take Fey home until after she had her shots and surgeries. When I finally got to see her, it was a bit heartbreaking. She seemed excited to see me (apparently drooling means she’s excited), even with one of her limbs gone, and her stitches were quite fresh. At the time I was a little surprised that they were releasing her only a couple days after her surgery. We later found out that there was a misunderstanding, and they thought we had insisted on having her right away (which was obviously not true…I would have preferred that she had as much professional care as possible post-surgery.

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Either way, we cared for her as best as we could. We kept her in our room with anything she needed until she was fully healed. Our roommate had a cat of his own, and we didn’t want them interacting right away. One day we noticed that she had tugged at her stitches, and the wound had opened. This was hard to see, and I just wanted to rush her to a vet…since it was a Sunday morning, this was easier said than done. After some phone calls, we found an emergency pet hospital and called a cab. With our luck, the first cab dropped us off at the wrong location. Once we finally found the hospital, all was well, and poor Fey had to have her wound stapled. We were then given antibiotics, and paid the fees (they were very nice and registered us as patients rather than emergency care). Fey also got a nice sweater our of it:

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Over the next few weeks, I believe she adjusted very well. She learned how to walk and even hop and run with only three limbs. She is very ambitious, and is determined to jump up wherever Freyja (our roommates cat) happens to be perching.

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The two cats disagreed at first, once Fey’s stitches were out and we allowed them to play. But eventually, they became best friends. They can usually be found grooming each other or cuddling.

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Fey is an amazing cat. She is very affectionate, with a hilarious personality. She uses her advantage to hide in the shadows and jump out at you when you least expect it, usually playfully swatting at your behind before running off to let you chase her. We also discovered a cataract in one of her eyes, which means possible complete loss of vision. We’re taking care of her the very best we can, we’ll deal with any challenges we face together. I love my little survivor 🙂 

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